Spanish Parents Must Support Their Children Financially for Life Reply

Spain job seekers

A Spanish court orders a divorced father to pay nearly £300 a month to his 31-year-old daughter in perpetuity

James Badcock writes for Telegraph.co.uk–Spanish parents must continue to support their children financially until they find a good job, a court has ruled. A divorced father from Galicia became a test case when a court ordered him to pay €400 (£289) a month to support his 31-year-old daughter until she earns enough money to support herself. It was the latest in a series of rulings that have deepened the financial responsibilities of parenthood in a country where children often stay at home long after their peers in Britain or other European countries have flown the nest.

Amador López (the court has not released his real name) had been estranged from his daughter until 2005, when a judge ruled he had to support her through an undergraduate and a postgraduate degree. When Mr López refused to pay the court-mandated €500 a month, his bank account was frozen according to Rosalía Bello, a lawyer who represents his daughter, identified as Clara. When Mr López appealed in 2014, the A Coruña court again sided with his daughter, although the monthly payment was slightly reduced to its present €400. Clara is now 31 years old. Her lawyer says she has taken several jobs since completing her studies, but has not yet managed to find a long-term position in keeping with her studies.

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Chomsky: Greece’s Syriza & Spain’s Podemos Face “Savage Response” Taking on Austerity “Class War” 1

Noam Chomsky Podemos

Noam Chomsky, world-renowned political dissident, linguist and author. He is institute professor emeritus at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught for more than 50 years.

Democracy Now.org–Following its election in January on a pledge to confront the austerity program that’s decimated Greece’s economy, the Syriza government has faced a major pushback from international creditors led by Germany. Days after Greece secured a four-month extension to a loan package in exchange for new conditions on its spending, Noam Chomsky says the European response to Syriza has been “extremely savage,” a reaction that could face Spain’s Podemos party should it win upcoming elections.

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An Interview with Legendary Spanish Chef Juan Mari Arzak Reply

Juan Maria Arzak

Miami Herald.com–Juan Mari Arzak, the legendary Spanish chef who helped spark a revolution in his homeland in the 1970s — not so much modernizing, but futurizing Basque cuisine and paving the way for later Spanish visionaries such as Ferran Adriá, that mad scientist of foams, airs and deconstructions — greets you in the lobby of the Metropolitan Hotel on Collins Avenue with a kiss on each cheek. And also a warning.

It’s after noon, but he has just gotten out of bed. “I’m not very hungry yet. There was a lot of traveling yesterday,” says Arzak, who at 72, with his wispy white hair and his gentle demeanor, might seem like any grandfatherly figure on vacation and out of place among the hipsters who are here to blow it out like they’re starring in their own MTV videos. But this grandfather can teach the youngsters a thing or two about living it up.

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Montilla, Andalucía, is Sherry Wine’s Secret Cousin Reply

Montilla Spain winery

East of Andalucía’s traditional sherry vineyards around Jerez is Montilla, where the finos and amontillados are possibly better than the better-known cousins, and hardly any tourists visit

The Guardian.com–Stick a pin in the centre of a map of Andalucía and you might well hit Montilla. Geographically this is the heart of Spain’s deep south, with Seville to the west and Granada over the mountains to the east. But as I thunder up the deserted motorway towards Córdoba from Málaga airport, I nearly miss the undulating vineyards that are the source of Montilla-Moriles fortified wines. And as most of the wineries are small affairs in the folds of the sierra, they, too, remain under the radar, as discreet as their brands. Only the determined traveller finds them – but I discover the effort pays off.

Moriles, to the south, is one half of this D.O. (Denominación de Origen) classification but the town of Montilla is the boss, on the edge of a rolling sierra of white limestone, where the pedro-ximénez grape flourishes. A close cousin of sherry in strength and flavour, Montilla-Moriles wines are not easy to track down. You can order a fragrant, dry fino, a nutty amontillado (named after Montilla), a voluptuous palo cortado or a figgy oloroso in Cordoba, but they’re rare further afield. Only 10 of the 170 producers export their nectar.

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In Muddy Fields, Spain’s International Brigades Live On Reply

Patricio Azcarate Diz

Roland Lloyd Parry writes for Mysinchew.com, Morata de Tajuna, Spain (AFP) — Through the mud and olive trees, Scotsman Andy Crawford trudges over the Spanish fields where eight decades ago his grandfather William fought and died. A Communist pipe-fitter from Glasgow, William was among tens of thousands of foreigners who fought in Spain’s 1936-1939 civil war as part of the International Brigades. Fearing the spread of fascism in Europe, they tried in vain to help Spain’s Republican army fend off Francisco Franco’s Nationalist uprising. “There were no medals to be won, no wages to be earned and they were frowned on by half the world,” said Andy, 66, standing on a hilltop near a stone monument to the brigades.

Along with 300 relatives and friends of the former “brigaders”, Andy marched on February 21 with flags waving to mark the anniversary of the Battle of Jarama, named after a river southeast of Madrid. In that three-week bloodbath in February, 1937, the International Brigades helped block Franco’s drive to cut off the strategic road linking two Republican strongholds, Madrid and Valencia. “People gave up everything just to come here and help,” said Andy. “You’ve got to hope you can instil them principles into your own family.”

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Zahara de los Atunes: Sun, Sea and Seafood in Southern Spain Reply

Zahara los Atunes

In south-west Spain, Kevin Gould celebrates laid-back beach life, plus meat and fish delicacies, in the foodie hangout of Zahara de los Atunes

The Guardian.com–She is Sahara of the Tuna, and you come for her deserted beaches and crowded fish restaurants, and for her beach shack chiringuitos in which to boogie the hot night away. Here in Cadiz province, Zahara de los Atunes lies between Cape Trafalgar and Spain’s southernmost nipple at Tarifa, 40 minutes to the south. Where Tarifa is bliss for spliffed-up surfers and world-weary dreadlocked hippies, Zahara is more innocent, a let-it-all-hang-out family destination. It is also one that has carved a part in the heart of the Spanish food lover with its devotion to the red tuna (Atlantic bluefin tuna, famed for its rosy flesh) and the red-skinned Retinto cow.

In this land that so honours the pig, Zahara’s red tuna is granted the title “the ibérico of the sea”. As ever, Spain can leave the dedicated vegetarian feeling hungry – even the plainest of mixed salads here will include fat chunks of tuna, “for flavour!” we were told. Your pomaded open-shirted playa type tends to prefer Atlanterra, a slick purpose-built beach resort two kilometres south of town, but Zahara itself is Spain’s far south at her authentic, relaxed best.

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Spain’s Women Chefs Demand Their Place at the Top Table Reply

Spanish women chefs

The country’s giants of cuisine are celebrated across the world – and are all men. Now women want recognition of their culinary skills and achievements

The Guardian.com–From Ferran Adrià, creator of the world-renowned El Bulli, to giants of cuisine such as José Andrés, who was awarded the Spanish Order of Arts and Letters in 2010, the modern generation of Spanish chefs has acquired a formidable reputation for innovation, creativity and flair. There are around 170 Michelin-starred restaurants in Spain. In culinary terms, the country has never had it so good.

However, in one crucial respect Spanish gastronomy stands accused of culpable conservatism. Where are the celebrity female chefs? “We’re not being given a voice,” Estíbaliz Redondo, the journalist behind online gastronomy magazine Al-Salmorejo said. Frustrated by the marginal role of women in high-flying gastronomic circles, she and Córdoba chef Celia Jiménez last week held Spain’s first-ever conference on women in the industry.

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British Are Sexually Uptight, Dirty and Drink Too Much – According to Spanish Book Reply

Fawlty1

Independent.co.uk–British people like to drink too much and would rather complete a crossword than have sex, according to a book published in Spain. Alberto Letona somewhat helpfully seeks to dispel the idea that Brits are hooligans who get blind-drunk in Spanish resorts by replacing them with a few dubious stereotypes of his own. The author of Sons and Daughters of Great Britain describes the populace of Britain as stingy and liking alcohol too much –according to The Times.

Brits also have trouble with intimacy, allegedly. It is a “trait”  that has long been lampooned in home-grown classic sitcoms such as Fawlty Towers, in which hotel owners Basil and Sybil do not even share the same bed. The long-standing class system also gets a good dressing-down as he criticises the way British people seek to keep up appearances or hide their real intentions with niceties. The former journalist, who is married to a British teacher and had lived in St Andrews and London, writes: “Middle-class people are more given to hypocrisy.”

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Witness: The Day Troops Held Spain’s MPs Hostage Reply

Antonio Tejero Molina

BBC.com–Six years after the death of Spain’s dictator General Franco, the country remained a fragile democracy. Political tensions continued despite free elections and a new constitution. Moreover the army was not fully behind the new democracy and some in uniform remained loyal to Franco. In February 1981, as parliament sat to swear in a new prime minister, 200 Spanish civil guards burst into the chamber and took all 350 MPs hostage.

Joaquin Almunia – who later became an EU Commissioner – was one of the MPs trapped in parliament as the civil guards, led by Lieutenant Colonel Antonio Tejero, fired into the air. Mr Almunia spoke to Witness about that dramatic day.

Witness is a World Service programme of the stories of our times told by the people who were there.

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Spain Wants to Ban Drunk Walking. What Next for Pedestrians? 1

drunk in Spain

The Spanish proposal to crack down on dangerous walking by reclassifying pedestrians as ‘users of the road’ is the latest salvo in an old turf war between cars and the people they hit

Guardian.com–Drunk tourists staggering down Spanish streets at night might need to pay more attention this summer. In a crackdown on dangerous walking, Spain’s Directorate General of Traffic plans to introduce breathalyser tests for pedestrians. They also suggest introducing an off-road speed limit for joggers. The proposals, buried among other road safety suggestions, would give pedestrians responsibilities akin to drivers – and ought to inspire other new laws in their footsteps.

Might we see other similar laws follow on their heels? Shortsighted people could be charged for leaving the house without their glasses, for instance. Walking and texting (and the associated crime of “moving like a robot”, as one Australian study described the result) might see you fined. You could get a ticket for wearing any clothing that is eye-catching enough to distract drivers – something Rome already gamely tried to introduce in its aborted 2008 miniskirt ban.

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